Parent-child attachment relationship || Relación de apego entre padres e hijos

What is the parent-child attachment relationship?

In his theory of attachment, Bowlby described the parent-child attachment relationship as a connection between a child and parent that helps keep the child safe and nurtured. Through repeated interactions with their parents, children learn how parents will respond to their needs (e.g., if they cry will the caregiver comfort them or ignore them?) and which behaviours will allow them to stay close to the parents. Later on, after observing interactions between mothers and infants, Mary Ainsworth (1978) concluded that attachment relationships could be classified into one of three categories: secure, insecure-resistant, and insecure-avoidant. She developed an observation procedure known as the Strange Situation Procedure to help classify infants’ attachment relationships. In the 1980’s, Main and Solomon observed the need for an additional category and so a fourth attachment category, known as disorganised/disoriented attachment, was added (Main & Solomon, 1990).

Children who have sensitive and responsive caregivers (i.e., caregivers who are aware of their needs and respond appropriately) tend to develop a secure parent-child attachment relationship. These children learn that it’s ok to have needs and express these needs, and that these needs will be met by the parent. Children who develop insecure-resistant attachment patters tend to have a caregiver who responds their child’s needs inconsistently (e.g., sometimes comforts them when they’re upset) while insecure-avoidant attachment relationships often develop when a caregiver is dismissive of the child’s needs (e.g., ignores their crying). A small proportion of children develop a disorganised attachment relationship, which tend to develop when a caregiver is frightening or frightened (e.g., in domestic violence situations). A secure parent-child attachment relationship has been linked to many benefits including more positive emotions, better emotional regulation (Cooke et al., 2019), lower levels of child behavioural problems, and lower levels of future mental health problems (Fearon et al., 2010; Ranson & Urichuk, 2008).

Assessing the parent-child attachment relationship

The parent-child attachment is usually assessed using standardized measures for research purposes or, in clinical settings, to inform treatment planning. The most common way to assess the parent-child attachment is using the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP). The SSP is a laboratory procedure used with children 12 to 18 months old. It was designed to activate a child’s attachment behaviours by slowly exposing them to situations that would increase their distress but also resemble real life situations, such as being away from their parent for a short period of time (see this video for an overview and example of the SSP: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTsewNrHUHU). How a child behaves during the SSP indicates the type of attachment relationship they have with that caregiver. Children with a secure attachment, usually show distress when separated from their caregiver and actively seek interaction with their caregiver when they return. Children with an insecure-avoidant attachment often do not display outward distress when separated from their caregiver and actively avoid their caregiver when they return. Children with an insecure-resistant attachment usually display distress when separated from their caregiver but when the caregiver returns they simultaneously seek contact and try to resist interacting with their caregiver (e.g., pushing the caregiver away). Children with a disorganised attachment relationship usually display contradictory attachment behaviors (e.g., incomplete behaviors such as going towards the caregiver and then turning away) when the caregiver returns (Main & Solomon, 1990).

How to help develop a secure parent-child attachment relationship:

Be attentive: Interact and engage with your child. Do this by playing with them, talking to them, and praising them. Some people find it difficult to interact with babies (toddlers are much easier because they force you to interact with them), especially first-time parents, a good trick for engaging with babies is to talk to them. “Talk to them about what?” I hear you ask! I definitely struggled with this. The easiest thing to do is describe to them what you’re doing (e.g., when changing their nappy, you can start by saying “I’m taking your pants and your nappy off”, “I’m putting a new nappy on”, “I’m putting your pants back on”, “oh you’re all nice and clean now!”, “thank you for being so calm while I changed you”).

Be sensitive to your child’s needs: Be aware of your child’s needs (e.g., hunger, sleep, comfort, play) and Respond to their needs:

  • If they’re hungry feed them (for babies this could mean breast or bottle feeding, the important thing is that you feed them and interact positively with them while you do it)
  • If they’re upset comfort them (i.e., pick them up and cuddle them, let them know you’re there and they’re ok). Young children will tell you what they need. If, for example, their arms are stretched out to you then they are signaling that they want to be picked up. If you miss read your child’s signals, they’ll tell you by signaling more (e.g., if they want to be fed and you think they want to be changed they’ll let you know by crying louder once they realise you’re not feeding them).

Resources:

Great books that can help you learn more about the parent-child attachment relationship and strategies for improving it include:

  1. Raising a Secure Child: How Circle of Security Parenting Can Help You Nurture Your Child’s Attachment, Emotional Resilience, and Freedom to Explore by Kent; Cooper, Glen; Powell, Bert; Benton, Christine Hoffman
  2. The whole brain child by Tina Payne Bryson and Daniel j. Siegel

References

Ainsworth, M. D. S., Blehar, M. C., Waters, E., & Wall, S. (1978). Patterns of attachment: A psychological study of the strange situation. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Cooke, J. E., Kochendorfer, L. B., Stuart-Parrigon, K. L., Koehn, A. J., & Kerns, K. A. (2019). Parent–child attachment and children’s experience and regulation of emotion: A meta-analytic review. Emotion (Washington, D.C.), 19(6), 1103-1126. https://doi.org/http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/emo0000504

Fearon, R. P., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M. J., Van IJzendoorn, M. H., Lapsley, A.-M., & Roisman, G. I. (2010). The significance of insecure attachment and disorganization in the development of children’s externalizing behavior: A meta-analytic study. Child Development, 81(2), 435-456. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2009.01405.x

Main, M., & Solomon, J. (1990). Procedures for identifying infants as disorganized/disoriented during the Ainsworth Strange Situation. In M. T. Greenberg, D. Cicchetti, & E. M. Cummings (Eds.), Attachment in the preschool years: Theory, research, and intervention (Vol. 1, pp. 121-160). The University of Chicago Press.

Ranson, K. E., & Urichuk, L. J. (2008). The effect of parent–child attachment relationships on child biopsychosocial outcomes: a review. Early Child Development and Care, 178(2), 129-152. https://doi.org/10.1080/03004430600685282

Español

¿Qué es la relación de apego entre padres e hijos?

En su teoría del apego, Bowlby describió la relación de apego entre padres e hijos como una conexión entre un niño y un padre que ayuda a mantener al niño seguro y protegido. A través de interacciones repetidas con sus padres, los niños aprenden cómo los padres responderán a sus necesidades (por ejemplo, si lloran, ¿los padres los consolarán o los ignorarán?) Y qué comportamientos les permitirán permanecer cerca de los padres. Más tarde, después de observar las interacciones entre madres e infantes, Mary Ainsworth (1978) concluyó que las relaciones de apego podrían clasificarse en una de tres categorías: seguras, inseguras-resistentes e inseguras-evitativas. Ella desarrolló un procedimiento de observación conocido como Procedimiento de Situación Extraña para ayudar a clasificar las relaciones de apego de los bebés. En la década de 1980, Main y Solomon observaron la necesidad de una categoría adicional y, por lo tanto, se agregó una cuarta categoría de apego, conocida como apego desorganizado / desorientado (Main y Solomon, 1990).

Los niños que tienen padres sensibles y receptivos (es decir, padres que son conscientes de sus necesidades y responden adecuadamente) tienden a desarrollar una relación segura de apego entre padres e hijos. Estos niños aprenden que está bien tener necesidades y expresarlas, y que estas necesidades serán cubiertas por sus padres. Los niños que desarrollan patrones de apego inseguro-resistente tienden a tener padres que responde de manera inconsistente a las necesidades del niño (p. Ej., A veces los consuelan cuando están molestos), mientras que las relaciones de apego inseguro-evitativo a menudo se desarrollan cuando un padre desprecia las necesidades del niño (p. Ej., ignora su llanto). Una pequeña proporción de niños desarrolla una relación de apego desorganizada, que tiende a desarrollarse cuando un padre es atemorizante o está asustado (por ejemplo, en situaciones de violencia doméstica). Una relación segura de apego entre padres e hijos ha sido relacionada con muchos beneficios que incluyen incremento de las emociones positivas, una mejor regulación emocional (Cooke et al., 2019), menores niveles de problemas de comportamiento infantil y menores niveles de problemas de salud mental en el futuro (Fearon et al., 2010; Ranson y Urichuk, 2008).

Evaluación de la relación de apego entre padres e hijos

El vínculo entre padres e hijos generalmente se evalúa utilizando medidas estandarizadas con fines de investigación o, en entornos clínicos, para informar la planificación del tratamiento. La forma más común de evaluar el vínculo entre padres e hijos es utilizando el Procedimiento de Situación Extraña (SSP en inglés). El SSP es un procedimiento de laboratorio que se usa con niños de 12 a 18 meses de edad. Fue diseñado para activar los comportamientos de apego de un niño al exponerlo lentamente a situaciones que aumentarían su angustia pero que también se asemejarían a situaciones de la vida real, como estar lejos de sus padres por un período corto de tiempo (vea este video para obtener una descripción general y un ejemplo de SSP: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTsewNrHUHU). La forma en que un niño se comporta durante el SSP indica el tipo de relación de apego que tienen con el padre. Los niños con un apego seguro, generalmente muestran angustia cuando se separan de su padre y buscan activamente la interacción con su padre cuando éste regresa. Los niños con un vínculo inseguro-evitativo a menudo no muestran angustia externa cuando se separan de su padre y evitan activamente a su padre cuando éste regresa. Los niños con un vínculo inseguro-resistente generalmente muestran angustia cuando se separan de su padre, pero cuando el padre regresa, simultáneamente buscan el contacto y tratan de resistirse a interactuar con sus padres (p. ej., empujar al padre). Los niños con una relación de apego desorganizada suelen mostrar comportamientos de apego contradictorios (por ejemplo, comportamientos incompletos como ir hacia el padre y luego darse la vuelta) cuando el padre regresa (Main y Solomon, 1990).

Cómo ayudar a desarrollar una relación segura de apego entre padres e hijos:

Sea atento: interactúa con tu hijo. Haz esto jugando con ellos, hablando con ellos y elogiándolos. A algunas personas les resulta difícil interactuar con los bebés (los niños pequeños son mucho más fáciles porque te obligan a interactuar con ellos), especialmente los padres primerizos, un buen truco para interactuar con los bebés es hablar con ellos. “¿Hablar con ellos sobre qué?” ¡Te escucho preguntar! Definitivamente esto fue difícil para mí también. Lo más fácil de hacer es describirles lo que estás haciendo (p. Ej., Cuando les cambias el pañal, puedes comenzar diciendo “Te estoy quitando los pantalones y el pañal”, “Te estoy poniendo un pañal nuevo”, “Te vuelvo a poner los pantalones”, “¡oh, ahora estás limpio y vestidito!”, “Gracias por quedarte tranquilo mientras te cambiaba”).

Se sensible a las necesidades de tu hijo: se consciente de las necesidades de tu hijo (por ejemplo, hambre, sueño, comodidad, juego) y responde a sus necesidades:

  • Si tienen hambre, aliméntalos (para los bebés esto podría significar amamantarlos o alimentarlos con biberón, lo importante es que los alimentes e interactúes positivamente con ellos mientras lo haces)
  • Si están molestos, consuélalos (es decir, recógelos y abrázalos, hazles saber que tu está allí y que están bien). Los niños pequeños te dirán lo que necesitan. Si, por ejemplo, tiene los brazos extendidos hacia ti, está indicando que quiere que lo levanten. Si no lees las señales de tu hijo, te darán más señales (p. Ej., Si quieren que les den de comer y tu crees que quieren que lo cambies, te avisará llorando más fuerte una vez que se den cuenta que no estás alimentándolos).

Recursos:

Dos libros excelentes que pueden ayudarte a aprender más sobre la relación de apego entre padres e hijos y las estrategias para mejorarla incluyen:

  1. Raising a Secure Child: How Circle of Security Parenting Can Help You Nurture Your Child’s Attachment, Emotional Resilience, and Freedom to Explore. Escrito por Kent; Cooper, Glen; Powell, Bert; Benton, Christine Hoffman
  2. The whole brain child. Escrito por Tina Payne Bryson and Daniel j. Siegel

Referencias

Ainsworth, M. D. S., Blehar, M. C., Waters, E., & Wall, S. (1978). Patterns of attachment: A psychological study of the strange situation. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Cooke, J. E., Kochendorfer, L. B., Stuart-Parrigon, K. L., Koehn, A. J., & Kerns, K. A. (2019). Parent–child attachment and children’s experience and regulation of emotion: A meta-analytic review. Emotion (Washington, D.C.), 19(6), 1103-1126. https://doi.org/http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/emo0000504

Fearon, R. P., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M. J., Van IJzendoorn, M. H., Lapsley, A.-M., & Roisman, G. I. (2010). The significance of insecure attachment and disorganization in the development of children’s externalizing behavior: A meta-analytic study. Child Development, 81(2), 435-456. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2009.01405.x

Main, M., & Solomon, J. (1990). Procedures for identifying infants as disorganized/disoriented during the Ainsworth Strange Situation. In M. T. Greenberg, D. Cicchetti, & E. M. Cummings (Eds.), Attachment in the preschool years: Theory, research, and intervention (Vol. 1, pp. 121-160). The University of Chicago Press.

Ranson, K. E., & Urichuk, L. J. (2008). The effect of parent–child attachment relationships on child biopsychosocial outcomes: a review. Early Child Development and Care, 178(2), 129-152. https://doi.org/10.1080/03004430600685282

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s